Saturday, June 12, 2021

U.S. Marines releases fascinating video of heavy lifts with CH-53 helicopters

The U.S. Marine Corps has released fascinating video footage shows CH-53E Super Stallion helicopters execute an air-to-air refuel, during a heavy lift exercise.

Two U.S. Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallions, assigned to Marine Aviation Weapons and Tactics Squadron One (MAWTS-1), execute a heavy lift exercise, in support of Weapons and Tactics Instructor (WTI) course 2-21, near Yuma, Ariz., March 31, 2021, according to a recent service news release.

During the training, they lifted two at once Humvee tactical vehicles, which is a mission often flown on deployment.

- ADVERTISEMENT - CONTINUE READING BELOW -

A CH-53 has the capability to externally lift approximately 36,000 pounds, which exceeds the lift capacity of every helicopter available to the military. The Super Stallion enables Marines to transport troops, vehicles, equipment and possibly downed aircraft, as well as support a variety of civil missions.

The WTI course is a seven-week training event hosted by MAWTS-1, providing standardized advanced tactical training and certification of unit instructor qualifications to support Marine aviation training and readiness, and assists in developing and employing aviation weapons and tactics.

Exercises like these greatly assist the unit’s overall mission readiness out in the field. When Marines need supplies delivered or heavy extractions performed, they and their Super Stallions will be ready.

If you wish to report grammatical or factual errors within our news articles, you can let us know by using the online feedback form.

If you would like to show your support for what we are doing, here's where to do it: patreon.com/defenceblog

Executive Editor

About this Author

Dylan Malyasov
U.S. defense journalist and commentator. Aviation photographer. Dylan leads Defence Blog's coverage of global military news, focusing on engineering and technology across the U.S. defense industry.

YOU MIGHT ALSO LIKE

TRENDING NOW