Saturday, February 24, 2024

United Technologies awarded $2,1 billion for F-35 Lightning engines

Famed jet engine maker Pratt and Whitney, a United Technologies subsidiary, has been awarded a $2,1 billion U.S. Navy contract modification for F135 propulsion systems.

This modification definitizes the production and delivery of 112 F135-PW-100 propulsion systems for the Air Force, 46 F135-PW-600 propulsion systems for the Marine Corps, and 25 F135-PW-100 propulsion systems for the Navy. In addition, this modification definitizes award of long lead components, parts and materials associated with 129 F135-PW-100 and 19 F135-PW-600 propulsion systems for non-U.S. Department of Defense (DoD) participants and Foreign Military Sales (FMS) customers.

The Pratt & Whitney’s F135 is an afterburning turbofan developed for the Lockheed Martin F-35 Lightning II, a single-engine strike fighter. Pratt & Whitney’s F135 propulsion system powers all three variants of the F-35 Lightning II fighter aircraft – the F-35A CTOL (Conventional Takeoff and Landing), F-35B STOVL (Short Takeoff and Vertical Landing) and F-35C CV (Carrier Variant).

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The F135-PW-100 used in the F-35A Conventional Take-Off and Landing variant.

The F135 has evolved from the proven F119 engine, which exclusively powers the U.S. Air Force’s F-22 Raptor, and features best-in-class single-engine reliability, fifth generation stealth capabilities as well as advanced prognostics and health management systems.

Since powering the F-35’s first flight in December 2006, the F135 has maintained high readiness levels that have enabled the program to meet flight test objectives and support operational requirements for all three aircraft variants. Supportability features are designed to offer ease of maintenance while achieving unprecedented engine reliability and maintainability.

An F135-PW-100 engine, which powers the F-35 Joint Strike Fighter, undergoes salt water corrosion testing in the Arnold Engineering Development Complex SL-3 facility at Arnold Air Force Base, Tenn., on Oct 23, 2016. Photo by Christopher D. Rogers

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Executive Editor

About author:

Dylan Malyasov
Dylan Malyasov
Dylan Malyasov is the editor-in-chief of Defence Blog. He is a journalist, an accredited defense advisor, and a consultant. His background as a defense advisor and consultant adds a unique perspective to his journalistic endeavors, ensuring that his reporting is well-informed and authoritative. read more

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