Friday, March 5, 2021

Russian deadly nuclear submarine launches four Bulava ballistic missiles

The Russian nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine (SSBN) Vladimir Monomakh has launched four Bulava intercontinental-range ballistic missiles for the first time, Russia’s Defense Ministry reported on Saturday.

“Today, the strategic missile submarine Vladimir Monomakh of the Pacific Fleet fired a salvo of four Bulava ballistic missiles as part of planned combat training activities,” the statement says.

A salvo launch of missiles was carried out from an underwater position from the Sea of Okhotsk at the Chizha training ground in the Arkhangelsk region, according to a recent service news release.

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The Vladimir Monomakh is a new Russian nuclear-powered submarine of Borei class. It is a fourth-generation nuclear-powered ballistic missile submarine that is joined the Russian Navy’s Northern and Pacific Fleets.

The new deadly submarine is the improved Project 955A strategic missile-carrying underwater cruiser. According to the data of Russia’s Defense Ministry, the sub is less noisy and features improved maneuvering, depth and armament control systems.

The Borei submarines have been developed by the Rubin Central Design Bureau for Marine Engineering. All of them can carry 16 Bulava missiles and are also armed with 533mm torpedo tubes.

The R-30 ‘Bulava’ intercontinental ballistic missile had been developed by the Moscow Institute of Thermal Technology since the mid-1990s under the direction of Chief Designers Yuri Solomonov and Alexander Sukhodolsky.

According to media reports, the Bulava is a three-stage solid-propellant missile that can carry up to six independently targeted warheads.

Overall, Russia has conducted about 30 test-launches of R-30 missiles since 2005, with about a third of them accompanied by various technical setbacks. The Bulava’s experimental operation started in 2013 when the Russian Navy accepted the Project 955 Borei-class lead missile-carrying submarine for service. In 2018, the Bulava went into service.

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Dylan Malyasov
U.S. defense journalist and commentator. Aviation photographer. Dylan leads Defence Blog's coverage of global military news, focusing on engineering and technology across the U.S. defense industry.

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