Thursday, September 24, 2020

U.S. Army set to acquire various Glock handguns

The U.S. Army Reserve is set to acquire various GLOCK firearms, holsters and associated spare parts, according to a recent request for proposals released on Federal Business Opportunities.

The Army Contracting Command – New Jersey (ACC-NJ) on behalf of the Combat Capabilities Development Command – Armaments Center (CCDC-AC) and the United States Special Operations Command (USSOCOM) and several other program offices is seeking potential sources to supply GLOCK-17, GLOCK-19, and GLOCK -26 handguns.

Systems of interest include Gen3, Gen4, and Gen5 generations for the models listed as well as MOS versions where available. Optional configurations include night sights or standard sights and threaded or non-threaded barrels. Spare parts include replacement factory Glock magazines, Concurrent Spare Parts (CSP) kits for above listed models, as well as à la carte spare parts. Holsters for systems of interest include holsters suitable for duty use as well as for concealed carry use.

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The G17, G19, and G26 are lightweight magazine fed pistols without compensated or ported barrels. They are equipped with the “Safe Action” System, a fully automatic safety system consisting of three passive, independently operating, mechanical safeties, which sequentially disengage when the trigger is pulled and automatically reengage when the trigger is released. Barrels are equipped with polygonal rifling.

The GLOCK is a series of polymer-framed, short recoil-operated, locked-breech semi-automatic pistols designed and produced by Austrian manufacturer Glock Ges.m.b.H.

Despite initial resistance from the market to accept a perceived “plastic gun” due to both unfounded durability and reliability concerns, as well as fears that its use of a polymer frame might circumvent metal detectors in airports, Glock pistols have become the company’s most profitable line of products as well as supplying national armed forces, security agencies, and police forces in at least 48 countries.

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Executive Editor

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